RoW Update

Northwestel gets go-ahead for joint marketing of bundles
Canada’s northermost telco, Northwestel Inc., has been green-lit by the CRTC to jointly market its wireline services with those of its wireless affiliate Northwestel Mobility Inc. (Telecom Decision 2003-65). The decision is a result of a Part VII Application filed by Northwestel in February asking the commission to remove provisions that prevented the company from jointly marketing wireline and wireless services.

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NL International News Briefs

U.S. federal court blocks implementation of Do Not Call list
The U.S. District Court in Oklahoma ruled that the Federal Trade Commission does not have the authority to enforce the Do Not Call registry that was due to take effect this week. Legislative scrambles by the House of Representatives and the Senate failed to reinstate the list.

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NL People

Janet Yale is now the executive VP, government and regulatory affairs, for Telus. She has just completed a four-year stint as president/CEO of the Canadian Cable Television Association and has worked for AT&T Canada. Jim Peters, who had been watching Ottawa for the western ILEC (NL, Feb. 10/03), will help with the transition before returning to Vancouver.

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NL Short Takes

Rock responds to foreign investment recommendations
Industry Canada minister Allan Rock, in a letter to House of Commons industry, science and technology committee chair Walt Lastewka, says, "the government acknowledges the appropriateness of your conclusion that removing foreign investment restrictions would benefit the telecommunications industry." But in his response to the recommendations of the committee (NL, May 6/03), the minister calls for further study to harmonize the differing viewpoints of the industry committee and the committee on Canadian Heritage. The government plans to table an amendment to the Telecommunications Act, requiring its review every five years in response to technological change.

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