Possible international distribution for new mobile shorts, says Bravo!FACT

The head of the Bravo!FACT fund is calling groundbreaking a series of commissioned short films for mobile handset screens. Produced for the first time for the fund in a formal partnership with the National Film Board (NFB), the series dubbed Shorts in Motion was unveiled at the Banff World Television Festival. Judy Gladstone, executive director of Bravo!FACT, tells Canadian NEW MEDIA that the series is now being submitted for showing at various high-profile Canadian film festivals, and will eventually be broadcast on parent CHUM Ltd.-owned specialty TV channel Bravo!.

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Discovery U.S. says it isn’t seeking carriage to Canadian cell phone users

The VP of sales and marketing at Discovery U.S. denies in an interview with affiliate publication Canadian Communications Reports that it is in talks with MobiTV to deliver the channel to cell phone users in Canada. "We are certainly not looking to do that. That would really send the folks at CTV bonkers," says John Risinger. Discovery U.S. is a partner with CTV in Discovery Canada.

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Online chat created for Vancouver hailed as effective suicide prevention tool

An innovative new chat application aimed at preventing teen suicide could be the recipient of a million dollars, which would be used to sell it internationally, and to bolster its limited use in the Vancouver area to a 24/7 operation. The chat application, used by Vancouver’s crisis centre, has garnered developer At Large Media a nomination for the prize money by VanCity, a local socially progressive bank. Emma Payne, a principal of At Large, tells Canadian NEW MEDIA that the application has helped the centre be more effective in reaching out to at risk youth than traditional telephone crisis lines. She adds that the firm and its partners hope to be able to offer it across North America to even smaller centres that may have little technological sophistication.

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Canadian copyright activists debate meaning of U.S. Grokster decision

Both sides in the Canadian file-sharing debate say the recent MGM v. Grokster decision in the U.S. bodes well for them, despite its lack of immediate applicability to the legal landscape here. The Supreme Court of the United States released on June 21 its decision against the file-sharing service Grokster Ltd., accepting arguments by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc. that the landmark Sony case had been misapplied by a lower court. The Supreme Court ruled that under some circumstances, third parties can be found to be contributing to copyright infringement even if their service or product has non-infringing uses. The decision for MGM has been widely seen as a victory for copyright holders struggling to mitigate the effects of file sharing on sales, though some public interest advocates say the ruling isn’t nearly as ground moving as it appears.

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