Nokia Canada names new GM

Richard White has been appointed GM for Nokia Products Ltd. with the responsibility for all aspects of the company’s mobile products organization, including Canadian strategy development, sales and channel execution, marketing, operations, product testing and customer support. White joins Nokia from Nokia-Siemens Networks where he acted as the sales director for radio access products, working closely with Rogers Wireless, Bell Canada and Telus.

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Bell unveils new data plan with Samsung Instinct

Bell Mobility announced late last week that it will bring the Samsung Instinct to Canada on August 8 – a device that is already experiencing significant uptake in the US where it was introduced about two weeks ago. A touch-screen device, the Instinct allows users to surf the Internet, take pictures, SMS as well as offers other multimedia functionality such as picture taking and music downloading.

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Contec names China-based board member

Contec Innovations has appointed Ma Yu, a telecom executive based in Beijing, China, as a member of its board of directors. Ma has been associated with Contec’s China business operations for a number of years as chair and controlling shareholder of Beijing KCTone Technology Co. Ltd., a mobile value-added service provider partnered with Chinese mobile operators.

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Changing Telecom Act to safeguard consumer telecom body unnecessary: CCTS head

A private member’s bill designed to give Canada’s new telecom consumer complaints agency legislative muscle has come under fire from the head of the agency. David McKendry, interim commissioner of the Commissioner for Complaints for Telecommunications Services (CCTS), says Conservative Senator Donald Oliver’s bill is "unnecessary" and "redundant", given that all the appeals against it have been dealt with and the agency is now up and running.

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Gov’t orders CRTC to review minority language broadcasting; hearing expected this fall

Can Canada’s broadcast industry be enticed to offer more and better services to minority English- and French-speaking communities? Can new digital technologies help? Those are among the questions Canadian Heritage has put to the CRTC, which expects to hold a major hearing by December to examine the state of linguistic duality on all broadcast platforms, including the Internet.

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